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Moving Tips

In numerous health and wellness studies, it has been proven that being “unwell” mentally or emotionally affects your physical wellness as well. Stress is no exception to this. When you are stressed, it can cause you to be unwell physically. You are more susceptible to getting sick, and even more susceptible to develop various diseases and conditions.

Make sure that you are taking care of yourself through learning to distress through decluttering. Decluttering routinely is the most effective method. This way you keep the clutter under control by consistently taking time to remove it. Keeping your house and life decluttered will also save you a lot of time and stress when you are moving. All of your possessions will be ready to go and you won’t have to worry about packing useless clutter.

Decluttering doesn’t only apply to physical clutter in your life. Clutter is really anything that is distracting and unnecessary. Social media, screen time, and TV time are all examples of clutter in your life. Reducing the usage of these will also decrease your stress level and increase your awareness and happiness.

Decluttering is a process, and if attempted to be done all at once, can cause even more stress than the clutter itself. Decluttering step by step is key to live a stressless, clutter-free life.

  1. Closets First
  2. Your closet is often the place with the most amount of clutter. It is hard to give up that shirt that you swear you are going to wear soon, and those jeans that still fit but just don’t go with anything. But it is necessary! The easiest rule of thumb is if you haven’t worn the article of clothing in the last year, then get rid of it. This will keep your closet uncluttered and up to date.

  3. Reduce Screen Time
  4. We all spend a lot of time on our phones every day, it’s just a fact of life at this point in time. A lot of the time that we spend on our phones, is wasted by not really doing anything. We are clicking through emails we never read, opening apps to get rid of the notification, things like that. If we unsubscribe from those emails, turn off those notifications then you can reduce your screen time easily. Once you do that, start consciously dedicating a time that you won’t spend on your phone.

  5. The “Junk Drawer”
  6. Everyone has a junk drawer in their house that has anything and everything in it. These are often a good culprit of clutter, and also an easy thing to fix. Go through your junk drawer and find a place for everything in it. Once you do that, you will be able to see the things you normally throw in the junk drawer and now that you have a place for them, you won’t put them in the junk drawer anymore. Dedicate the drawer to specific things that you don’t have a set place for.

  7. Go Through You Attic
  8. While growing up, I moved several times. I noticed on the 5th or 6th move that I was hauling around some of the same boxes in storage that I had been for every other move, and I hadn’t looked at the box since the last time I moved. Some of the boxes are keepsakes that are worth hauling around with you, but some are just junk that you decided to save at some point in your life. Go through your storage boxes every couple of years to make sure you want to keep everything in them, this will also make moving so much easier when the time comes.

  9. General Decluttering
  10. Huffington Post gives the suggestion to go through your possessions and asking yourself, “does this add value to my life?” to determine if you should keep something. This way it’s harder for you to make excuses for why to keep something you know you will never use or haven’t used in the last 10 years.

Planning, packing, moving boxes, and saying goodbyes are just a couple of the things on your plate when you are in the process of making a move. Through all of this, how are you supposed to remember the little things? Remembering those little things can make or break your moving experience. So here are a few “lifesavers” from my experience and others, that may be essential for your move.

First Things First
Before you start any of your packing, planning or anything else you want to set aside the things that you do not want to be packed. This will, of course, include the basics that you probably already thought of like clothes for at least a week depending on your moving situation.

A mistake that I have made the mistake many times is when I get in “the mode” of packing everything and I pack things that I think I might need so that I don’t have to worry about them on the move. I almost always regret this later. When you are staying in a hotel or just getting into your new home, the last thing you want to do is dig through a box or have to go to the store because you packed all of the conditioner or band-aids. So the main thing to consider here is to think ahead. Think of the things that you use most often or that you would need on a short notice. Those are the things that you want to make sure to leave off of the moving truck.

Move In/Move Out Materials
Before you start the packing process there is a good chance you already have the closing papers signed on your current house and on your new house. Because we do this ahead of time, we often push it out of our mind after that because we have so much else to worry about. In the beginning stages of packing, you should make sure that you have all of your current house keys and essentials that stay with the house in a strictly, “do not pack box”. The last thing you want to worry about is going through all the boxes in the moving truck to find a couple of small keys. Every house sale has different requirements, and this may not even apply to you. But make sure you know, so your move can go more seamlessly.

Essentials
A couple of things that you may not think would be important to pack can sometimes be very handy during the move. A couple of ideas given by Trulia are:

  • First-aid kit
  • Chargers
  • Sheets and a pillow
  • Toiletries
  • Shower curtain
  • Paper towels and toilet paper
  • Flashlight
  • Paper plates and plastic utensils
  • Medications
  • Identification cards
  • Snacks
  • Credit and debit cards

If you’ve just moved to a new house, you know how overwhelming it feels to be faced with the task of unpacking at the end. Moving is exhausting, so unpacking is probably the last thing you want to do. However, you’ll need to unpack at least the essentials if you want your home to be livable. Keep in mind that you don’t have to unpack everything in one day or even one week, you can spread the process out over a few days. You can make unpacking less stressful by prioritizing rooms, starting with the biggest items and using a packing checklist ahead of time.

From the moving experts at Crown Moving in St. George, Utah, here are a few more tips to make unpacking a little less painful:

  1. Be aware of what you’re unpacking
  2. You can do this by creating an inventory list before you move, so you’re aware of what is in each box. This way you don’t end up with a haphazard pile of useless items.
  3. Unpack the essentials first.
  4. Bedding, appliances and electronic devices are just a few examples of essentials. Anything you need to feel comfortable and get you through the first few days is an essential.
  5. Start with the kitchen and bathrooms.
  6. Your kitchen and bathroom should be functional before anything else, as a good meal and a refreshing shower are necessary for most people to feel normal and comfortable. When your kitchen is more or less “set up” it can serve as a neat, organized place for your whole family to congregate in and take a break from the disorganized mess that is moving in.
  7. Assemble your furniture.
  8. No one likes building furniture, but it has to be done at some point. You might as well get it over with right away instead of leaving boxes of un-assembled furniture lying around for weeks or even months.
  9. Leave the garage and outdoors for last.
  10. These are the items you’re not going to need for a while, so don’t worry about them during the first few days or even weeks at your new house.
  11. Don’t procrastinate.
  12. You’ll never fully feel at home until you’re unpacked. Living with boxes around you creates unnecessary clutter, and it doesn’t look pretty either. Moving in gives you the chance to start fresh and create a beautiful, organized space that makes you feel safe and at ease.

Packing fragile items is always risky when moving. Sometimes even though you feel like you packed everything perfectly, things still seem to break during the move. The best ways to pack items to avoid them breaking can be tricky and unique for different items. Knowing the best tricks for packing fragile items when moving is the best way to make a smooth go easy.

When packing fragile things, one of the most important things is to make sure there is no movement or space in the box. If everything is packed tightly, the fragile items will not have room to move around and break. You don’t want to pack the boxes too full though because if they are bulging the boxes will not stack very well and can fall easily. Different materials usually require different methods of packing as listed below.

Glass
The best way to pack class according to U Ship is as follows. You want to get a few protective materials first. You will need some packing paper, this can be purchased or you can use newspaper or something similar. You will also need bubble wrap, tape, and packaging materials. You will start with wrapping the item in a layer of paper and then a couple layers of bubble wrap. Then you tape the bubble wrap to itself to prevent it from undoing itself. You then do this with the rest of the glass items until you have enough to fill the box. Then place your packaging material of choice in between the items in the box so that they fit snug against each other with no wiggle room.

Mirrors
If you are moving mirrors you want to take extra precautions to avoid them from breaking. The first thing you want to do is use painters tape to make a star on the surface of the mirror. This helps to absorb vibrations and keeps the glass from moving around and to prevent the mirror from breaking. You can then use bubble wrap and/or blankets to protect the outside of the mirror. You can also get foam pieces for the corners of the mirror if it is a more delicate mirror.

Furniture
Furniture in moves can easily get dinged and scratched. The best way to protect it is to get corner foam pieces to put on furniture that it will fit on. You can also use plastic wrap to protect the surface of the material from getting dirty and scuffed. If you are packing lamps you want to pack the shade separately in papers and bubble wrap in a box. The stand can be packed in a box or just with bubble wrap.

Sometimes the best time to move is not always the most convenient time. If you are one of the lucky movers that will be moving around Valentine’s Day, no need to fret! You can still have a very romantic day, you will just have to get a little more creative in your romantic shenanigans. But all in all, it just adds to the excitement of your sentimental day.

Date Night Package
When you first move into a new place it takes a minute for it to really feel like home. With Valentine’s Day right around the corner, it is the perfect excuse to take a break from packing and break in your new place. Create a gift basket for your significant other that has your guys’ favorite snacks, movies, drinks, and knick-knacks. Then you can even go get your favorite take out and enjoy a relaxing Valentine’s in your new home. You don’t have to go and do anything on Valentine’s Day to make it special, just putting in some effort to show you care will go a long way.

At-Home Massage
A massage is the perfect Valentine’s gift, and chances are it is exactly what your partner needs. After days of packing, moving, and unpacking your muscles will definitely be tight and sore. Help ease your significant others stress and tension by giving them a massage a home. It doesn’t cost anything, and it will mean the world to them. If you are feeling extra romantic then set up the room with candles and music to set the mood.

Explore Your New City
There isn’t a better time to go explore what your new destination has to offer! Book a romantic dinner at a local restaurant, or just go on a romantic walk through the downtown areas. You will most likely be in need of a break from unpacking, and so getting out the house to distract you for a moment can be much needed.

Leave Notes
People always say it’s the little things that count, and this can come in handy for you. The day before Valentine’s day leave little love notes tucked in the top of boxes that your partner will unpack. Your partner will love the surprise of finding the notes and will appreciate your creativity and effort. Sometimes you forget to tell your significant other the little things you admire and appreciate about them, but this is the perfect opportunity to do it.

If you’ve just moved to a new house, you know how overwhelming it feels to be faced with the task of unpacking at the end. Moving is exhausting, so unpacking is probably the last thing you want to do. However, you’ll need to unpack at least the essentials if you want your home to be livable. Keep in mind that you don’t have to unpack everything in one day or even one week, you can spread the process out over a few days. You can make unpacking less stressful by prioritizing rooms, starting with the biggest items and using a packing checklist ahead of time.

From the moving experts at Crown Moving in St. George, Utah, here are a few more tips to make unpacking a little less painful:

  1. Be aware of what you’re unpacking
  2. You can do this by creating an inventory list before you move, so you’re aware of what is in each box. This way you don’t end up with a haphazard pile of useless items.

  3. Unpack the essentials first
  4. Bedding, appliances, and electronic devices are just a few examples of essentials. Anything you need to feel comfortable and get you through the first few days is essential.

  5. Start with the kitchen and bathrooms
  6. Your kitchen and bathroom should be functional before anything else, as a good meal and a refreshing shower are necessary for most people to feel normal and comfortable. When your kitchen is more or less “set up” it can serve as a neat, organized place for your whole family to congregate in and take a break from the disorganized mess that is moving in.

  7. Assemble your furniture
  8. No one likes building furniture, but it has to be done at some point. You might as well get it over with right away instead of leaving boxes of un-assembled furniture lying around for weeks or even months.

  9. Leave the garage and outdoors for last
  10. These are the items you’re not going to need for a while, so don’t worry about them during the first few days or even weeks at your new house.

  11. Don’t procrastinate
  12. You’ll never fully feel at home until you’re unpacked. Living with boxes around you creates unnecessary clutter, and it doesn’t look pretty either. Moving in gives you the chance to start fresh and create a beautiful, organized space that makes you feel safe and at ease.

Moving is never a walk in the park, but by general consensus, the kitchen is the most difficult room to pack up for even the most seasoned mover. Kitchens contain everything from expensive gadgets and sharp tools to perishable food and sundries. The key to the kitchen is to start packing up as early as possible because there are some items you can pack up in the beginning and some (like food) that you need to leave until the end.

Kitchen Packing Tips and Tricks

Here are some more useful tips on packing up your kitchen for a move:

Start Eating!

To avoid hauling excessive amounts of food and dealing with frozen items, prepare and eat as much of it as possible. If there’s edible food you don’t want, donate it to a food bank or shelter. If you take food with you seal open containers or transfer the contents to another container before transporting them. Make sure to evenly disperse cans into several boxes so they aren’t too heavy. Limit spending on groceries and kitchen supplies until you move and ensure that you leave behind enough daily supplies.

Declutter the kitchen

The first step in packing up your kitchen is to clean and sort through everything. Take everything out of cabinets and drawers and assess what is worth keeping. Rusty kitchen tools and pointless kitschy items really don’t need to go with you into your new house. Now is a chance to start fresh. Decluttering will reduce the number of items you need to pack and by creating designated piles to pack, donate and trash you’ll eliminate stress.

Pack Away the Seasons

Holiday dishes, glassware and utensils, summertime barbecue amenities and birthday cake plates are all items that can be packed up or placed in storage immediately. These are items you don’t need all the time, so packing those up won’t disrupt your daily routine.

Use Specific Moving Boxes and Techniques

There are unique, fragile items in the kitchen that you need to pack with proper boxes. Specially designed dish boxes and bubble wrap will protect your breakables, but you can also use dish towels, old newspapers or plastic bags. Stack containers inside one another to save space, avoid making boxes too heavy and pack cookbooks separately. You can also wrap knives in cardboard and tape to protect yourself from the blades. New moving boxes should always be used for kitchen items, as they are sturdier and less likely to break through.

Even if you’re only moving across town, moving house is a stressful experience. Crown Moving is here to make your moving experience easy and stress-free. You can prepare yourself for the big day and eliminate extra stress by reading the following tips:

Measure ahead of time

The advantage of a short-distance move is that you can easily measure your new space. This will save you significant time on moving day because you’ll know exactly where to place furniture, how much closet space is available and how your décor is going to play in.

Evaluate your belongings

You may not think you own that much “stuff”– that is until you start packing up for a move. We accumulate a lot of things, whether it’s mugs, board games, shoes, old papers or random knick-knacks. The smartest way to evaluate what you own is to take a mental inventory of your possessions and then triple it because you probably own more than you think.

Appreciate cardboard boxes

Maybe you think it’s a pain to track down large cardboard boxes but they will be lifesavers in the end. A large, sturdy cardboard box is still the easiest, quickest way to pack a lot of stuff all at once. Just make sure to pad and wrap breakable items before placing them in the box.

Prioritize items

Deciding what to move first is essential if you want to be efficient and reduce the overall stress of moving house. Things you will need immediately at the new house include scissors, box cutters, trash bags, utensils, cookware, toiletries, toilet paper, chargers, power strips, and tools. Put all of these things in a clear bin so you can see them and differentiate the items from the myriad of cardboard boxes. Labeling boxes by room will make unpacking much more manageable, as it allows you to take one room at a time without being overwhelmed.

If it goes in first, it comes out last

Whatever you put in first will come out last, so don’t put chargers, your toothbrush, essential toiletries or any other must-have items at the bottom of a box. Strategically think about what you use the most and what you don’t need right away and pack accordingly.

Remember the necessities

You need to be able to use the bathroom, shower, eat and sleep in your new place on the first night. Moving is tiring and stressful and being able to have a semi-normal routine will keep you sane and refresh you for the next day. Focusing on organizing your whole kitchen in lieu of setting up your bed will leave you exhausted and unhappy when it’s time to finally get some sleep.

Moving makes us anxious, but it is even more stressful for our furry family members. Dogs and cats are easily stressed out when there’s unexpected activity in the home or when they’re placed in a new environment. No matter what kind of pet you’re moving, it isn’t going to be easy. However, we have some tips to make the experience a little less nerve-wracking for our animal friends.

Make a kit

Prepare an easy-to-access overnight kit with enough food, litter, toys and grooming tools for your pet to be comfortable and calm during the first few days of unpacking.

Talk to the vet

If you’re leaving the area, inform your vet so you can take records and prescription medications with you. Also, ask your vet if they recommend another in the new neighborhood.

Keep the pet in a quiet space

To make sure your pet is not stressed out, keep them in the quietest area possible. You can leave them with a friend or at a kennel for the day, but if you’d rather not at least remove them from the noise and action. Put them in a quiet room on another floor with a closed door or inside their carrier or kennel. Check in on them regularly and make sure to feed, walk and play with them like you normally do.

Use your own vehicle

Cats and small dogs should be put in a carrier in the back seat and then secured with a seatbelt. Bigger dogs can be moved in a kennel in the back of the car, though you might need to put the seats down. Sometimes animals feel more comfortable if you put a blanket over the carrier so they can’t see the changing environment.

Let them adjust

If your pet escapes before adjusting to the new neighborhood, they can easily get lost. Keep them inside for a while so they can adjust. More and more people are keeping cats indoors for safety reasons, so moving is a good opportunity to get them used to only being inside.

Buying or renting a new place is expensive no matter how you go about it. When you’re house hunting, you’re probably not thinking about moving expenses because all you want is to find the best place, at the right price in a decent neighborhood. Once you purchase a home or sign a lease and pick a moving date, costs start piling up. Not all of these expenses are anticipated, so read our blog post below to learn more about costs that can sneak up on you.

Insurance Rates and Coverage

Insurance rates, including car, health or renter’s insurance, are subject to change when you move. Car insurance often changes based on population, income and accident rates in the area. Coverage for car and health insurance can differ on a state-to-state basis. Renter’s insurance also depends on where you live, so investigate rate and/or coverage changes as soon as possible.

Storage Costs

Self-storage units are a great option, but the costs can increase quickly, particularly if you need to keep belongings there for an extended period of time. Constant traveling to the unit can also raise your gas expenses and wear and tear on your car. Make sure to only store things that are absolutely necessary and try to find a unit near your new house.

Replacement Appliances and Supplies

You might want to replace old or broken appliances in your new home. You might also notice that your supplies are old and broken, but you now require them for the new house. It’s possible you may even need items that you did not in the previous house.

Change in Utilities

Utilities like gas, electricity, and water are necessary, but there are also hidden costs that can pop up. If you buy a larger house, you might be charged more for your utilities. To initiate utility service, you may need to provide a deposit. Cancelling or transferring services might also require payment. Keep careful records of utility bills and any that overlap to confirm you aren’t overcharged.

Mailing Address Change

Make sure you change your address and have your mail forwarded to your new address before you’ve completely moved in. You will receive all correspondence in a timely fashion and be able to pay bills without incurring late fees or losing documents. Even when the new resident is kind enough to return your mail to the post office so it can be forwarded, it still might arrive too late.